BLOG

Sir David Henry Reeves

  • By Peter Nutkins
  • 29 Sep, 2017
Once in a while, we meet someone who gives us a very different view on life.

We can get so caught up in our own world, and live life thinking that the people around us have similar ambitions, definitions of success, and failure.

To look at he was dishevelled and unwashed. Under his hat his eyes darted to and fro, watching passers-by who largely ignored him. Driving the vigilance was a restless mind. A man who had experience that most people would only ever read about in action-packed novels.

He referred to himself as Sir David. A life in the forces had provided a unique perspective on society. His respect for Queen and Country had been shaken by a number of events he had witnessed. His account of life in the military, and how missions had been carried out was both engaging and at the same time horrifying.

We sat in the sun. He shared memories of his childhood, his own children, and the highlights and lowlights in between. Tales of saving Gadaffi's life mixed in with meeting Jesus in 1959 and conspiracies between our Royal Family and the Russian leadership.

I sat and listened. Maybe I was the only one who had for some time. He was angry and defeated.

I left him in the sun.

He waved as I crossed the road and headed into the hustle and bustle of 'normal' life.

Later at a coffee shop, I searched online for Sir David Henry Reeves. I could find nothing.

Did it really matter?

I had met with Sir David...real or not.

It was an experience I found humbling, and one I will not quickly forget.

Peter's Blog

By Peter Nutkins 14 Oct, 2017
Deep in the forest, in the hollow of a tree, can be found a clump of mushrooms. By themselves, they were beautiful to look at and proved a welcome break from trudging through the autumn leaves.

Ordinarily, I love autumn. The countryside ablaze with vibrant swathes of red and yellow. The sound of rustling as leaves as they skip along up due to a gust of wind. The change in temperature is exhilarating and wakes up the imagination as creatures can now be seen scampering around where, just a few weeks before, they were hidden by foliage.

On this trip to the woods, I was hoping to capture something of the splendour, and majesty this time of year affords. Actually, I had arrived a little too early. Sure there were some leaves underfoot, a few branches were turning orange, but nothing spectacular.

Until I found the mushrooms.

These would be a great focal point to a shot. They just needed a little something extra.
By Peter Nutkins 29 Sep, 2017
Once in a while, we meet someone who gives us a very different view on life.

We can get so caught up in our own world, and live life thinking that the people around us have similar ambitions, definitions of success, and failure.

To look at he was dishevelled and unwashed. Under his hat his eyes darted to and fro, watching passers-by who largely ignored him. Driving the vigilance was a restless mind. A man who had experience that most people would only ever read about in action-packed novels.

He referred to himself as Sir David. A life in the forces had provided a unique perspective on society. His respect for Queen and Country had been shaken by a number of events he had witnessed. His account of life in the military, and how missions had been carried out was both engaging and at the same time horrifying.

We sat in the sun. He shared memories of his childhood, his own children, and the highlights and lowlights in between. Tales of saving Gadaffi's life mixed in with meeting Jesus in 1959 and conspiracies between our Royal Family and the Russian leadership.

I sat and listened. Maybe I was the only one who had for some time. He was angry and defeated.

I left him in the sun.

He waved as I crossed the road and headed into the hustle and bustle of 'normal' life.

Later at a coffee shop, I searched online for Sir David Henry Reeves. I could find nothing.

Did it really matter?

I had met with Sir David...real or not.

It was an experience I found humbling, and one I will not quickly forget.
By Peter Nutkins 22 Sep, 2017
A trip to the Isle of Skye, in the Highlands of Scotland, was a little disappointing as photography was almost non-existent. The characteristic wind, rain, mist and cloud shrouded the Isle for the whole stay. All was not lost though as we drove along the shoreline of Loch Duich. 

This boat had been abandoned by the waters of the Loch and rested on a bed of seaweed and sand. The weather was harsh. Rain poured down and a soaking mist hung in the air. This gritty black and white image reflects the feeling of the scene as I viewed it. The landscape is awe inspiring, and I find stirs my emotions. Maybe in a distant past I have some Scottish blood!

Peter 
By Peter Nutkins 19 Sep, 2017
How often when you are having your photograph taken does the person behind the camera say "SMILE!"?

Instantly everyone puts on their best grin and the shutter is released.

Does this give the best portrait? I do not think so. In fact I often ask my subjects not to smile....then they do, only naturally . I like happy looking people, but only if the happiness is actually real. Otherwise it is just a picture of someone. Not a portrait.

There are times when a serious look really adds to the mood and overall image. Take this portrait for example. This chap was in a very serious mood and he had dressed in a mature way. The Facial expression helps make him look more masculine, older (which he liked) and expressed his mood on that day.

The Painterly look gives that classic element to the Portrait. There is less detail and so it helps the viewer focus on the face which sets the whole tone of the photograph.

I hope you like it.

Peter
By Peter Nutkins 15 Sep, 2017
The Battle of Culloden ( Blàr Chùil Lodair)  in 1745 was a turning point in British and European history. It is strange to imagine that a battle, and a bloody one at that, happened on our soil so recently. The Jacobites, led by Charles Stuart, met with Government forces led by the Duke of Cumberland, William Augustus.

The battlefield itself is an inspiring place to visit. The National Trust for Scotland have done a remarkable job of bringing the moor back to the former state it would have been in at the time of the battle. Alone on the battle field stands Leanach Cottage. The Cottage once was part of a landscape divided into smallholdings on the Culloden Battlefield. Most likely it served as a field hospital and was in the shape of a 'T'. Today it stands as a reminder of a bygone time.

Both sides stood for what they believed, and so many died for their cause. In the aftermath of the battle terrible atrocities were committed against the Highland people and their way of life. By violence the Scottish uprising was to be broken once and for all. 

Today Highlanders are free to wear tartan and kilts. The land is prospering and the people genuine and kind. In my visit to this proud nation I found a welcome that I have rarely found elsewhere. The people of the Highlands have overcome. Violence has not won the day. 

If only we could learn from our own history!

Peter
Share by: